Thin line between shock and surprise  

 

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Although new ideas are needed, it is definitely not a guarantee new ideas are embraced. People are in the operating modus and as a result have the tendency to rely on routine. New ideas are out of the ordinary, have the tendency to brake routines and often take time to be implemented and, most importantly, make money.

That’s why new ideas often are perceived as a shock and that creates resistance. So the challenge is to make the idea come as a uplifting surprise. I made a small analysis of how ideas can be embraced:

How it is told
Most importantly it is the way the idea is told. Actually, it is better not to explain the idea. The best way is to define the problem, translate that into an opportunity and describe it in am inspiring way, so that people discover the idea almost by themselves. Words that help selling the idea are ‘imagine’ of ‘for example’,

Who’s telling it
Resistance can be a result of ego or focus and as a result, not anybody in an organisation can be the bringer of an idea. So the idea maker has to be tactical in choosing people to share the idea with. That also means the idea maker has to set aside his or her ego and focus on the added value it can bring to many.

When is it told
Interestingly enough, ideas are more embraced when others have already done it. Especially when it’s been successful. Problem of course is that it’s not original anymore and is actually not a new idea, but a copycat.

Actually the latter is the proof, that when you’re able to create the right story around a new idea and are able to tell it in an inspiring way, the biggest change people embracing it one creates.

It reminds me of a quote of David Ogilvy:

“In the modern world of business, it is useless to be a creative original thinker unless you can also sell what you create. Management cannot be expected to recognize a good idea unless it is presented to them by a good salesman”

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Thin line between shock and surprise  

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